Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez The Elk Advocate

ISBN:

Published:

Kindle Edition

10 pages


Description

Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez  by  The Elk Advocate

Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez by The Elk Advocate
| Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 10 pages | ISBN: | 9.49 Mb

“Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez” provides short biographies of three important political figures in mid-nineteenth century Mexico- Emperor Maximilian I, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and BenitoMore“Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez” provides short biographies of three important political figures in mid-nineteenth century Mexico- Emperor Maximilian I, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez.Maximilian I (1832-1867) was born Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph in Austria.

He was the younger brother of the Austrian emperor Franz Joseph I. Maximilian was a member of Europe’s powerful Habsburg family. He served in the Austrian navy.Later on he was recruited by the French emperor Napoleon III to become the emperor of Mexico. The French army had invaded Mexico in 1861, as part of Napoleon III’s ambition to re-establish a great French empire in the Americas. Maximilian agreed to be crowned emperor of a French-backed Mexican Empire.The United States opposed establishment of the French puppet state in Mexico, but was too preoccupied with its own Civil War to take serious action against the Maximilian and the French.The French and Maximilian faced continuing armed resistance from Mexican republicans, led by former president Benito Juarez.

After the American Civil War ended I 1865, the United States began to provide more aid to the Mexican republicans.When the French withdrew their forces from Mexico in 1866, Maximilian was left with little protection. Without French military backing, his regime promptly collapsed, like the South Vietnamese government after the Americans left Vietnam, or the Afghan Communist regime after the withdrawal of the Soviet troops.Maximilian was captured by the Mexicans in 1867 and executed. The former emperor’s execution is commemorated in a well-known painting by the nineteenth centry French painter Edouard Manet.Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (1794-1874) was a Mexican military leader and politician who played an important role in the country from independence into the second half of the nineteenth century.Santa Anna was born in the state of Veracruz, in Mexico, which was then the Spanish colony of New Spain.

When Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, launched a war from independence from Spain in 1810, Santa Anna fought with the Spanish army against the rebels.Santa Anna rose through the ranks of the Spanish army, but he later defected to the pro-independence rebels led by Agustin de Iturbide (later the Emperor of Mexico). Santa Anna distinguished himself as a commander in the rebel armies, expelling the Spanish from the strategic port of Veracruz.After independence, Santa Anna became heavily involved in the political intrigues and regime changes of Mexico.

Santa Anna is probably best known in the United States, however, for his role in the Texas Revolution. When American colonists in Texas (which was then part of Mexico) rebelled against Mexican rule, Santa Anna led the Mexican army against them. He defeated the rebels at the Alamo, but was defeated and captured himself at the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836.Santa Anna eventually returned to Mexico. He fought unsuccessfully against the Americans in the Mexican-American War (1846-1848). Finally he was overthrown and exiled. He returned to the Mexico in his old age to spend his last few years, before he died in 1876.Benito Juarez was (1859-1865) served as Mexico’s president from 1859 until 1872, although his term was interrupted by the establishment of Maximilian’s imperial government from 1864 to 1867.Juarez was born to poor indigenous Zapotec peasant parents in Oaxaca, in southern Mexico.

He found a job as a servant for Antonio Maza, a man whose daughter he later married. Juarez went to law school, becoming a lawyer, judge, and, finally, the governor of Oaxaca state.



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Three Nineteenth Century Mexican Leaders: Maximilian, Santa Anna, and Benito Juarez":


wploityce.pl

©2013-2015 | DMCA | Contact us